Brazil

English

The Brazilian non-governmental organization Justiça Global, partner organization of the Heinrich-Böll-Foundation, released this publication, that intends to be a tool that allows journalists to know the other side of this mega event, which resulted in the aggravation of processes of segregation, control and privatization of public spaces, and extermination of the black, poor population in the city.

The private security industrie is definitely among the sectors that most benefit from mega events. Within a dubious relationship the security industry does not only supply the Brazilian State with surveillance systems and weapons, it also influences the organization of federal police and military forces.

Half a million people are expected to visit Rio de Janeiro during the Olympics and Paralympics in August and September. At first glance this will be a huge benefit for the city. But just as for the World Cup in 2014, the city has become a contested space of political and economic interests.

The football World Cup in Brazil cost the country at least €8.5 billion euros but did not stimulate economic growth. In 2016 the Summer Olympics and Paralympic Games are coming to Rio de Janeiro once again. Dawid Danilo Bartelt illustrates how sporting mega-events have established themselves as a business model. The losers are often the host city’s most vulnerable people, democracy and human rights.

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A compensation mechanism could provide countries with incentives to stop their deforestation and thus reduce emissions. However, this relatively simple economic solution remains controversial.

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In an interview with Heinrich Böll Foundation Brasil, journalist Thamyra Thâmara, from Complexo do Alemão, speaks about the importance of digital media for popular communicators in the favelas–spaces which are stigmatized by the mainstream media and portrayed as impoverished and violent.

The Heinrich-Böll-Foundation Brazil asked four female Experts from different generations to reflect the progress of women’s rights in Brazil since 1995.

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In Brazil, despite symbolic political actions, commitment still has not moved beyond words concerning women's reporductive rights. HBS interviews Guacira de Oliveira, from CFEMEA – Feminist Center for Studies and Counseling, a Brazilian feminist organization

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In Brazil, women of color face double discrimination because of their gender and skin color. Most often, they live in favelas - the slums of the poor at the cities' outskirts. Manoela Vianna reports about three women who fight for a change

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Do Brazil's women have an equal share in politics? Despite the 2014 election of a woman prime minister - Dilma Roussef - Brazil is far from gender equality. An analysis by Marilene de Paula.
 

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