Climate Change

English

Geoengineering is a dangerous distraction

Analysis

Geoengineering technologies are considered by many to be the most practicable solution to overcome the climate crisis. They are mainly a means to secure the predominant role of fossil fuels in the economy.

By Carroll Muffett

Soils are more than carbon sinks

Agriculture and climate change are closely linked, and soils store vast amounts of carbon. But what happens when carbon sequestration in the fields of smallholders becomes a new focus in climate and agricultural policies? 

By Magdalena Heuwieser

Radical Realism for Climate Justice

Dossier

Limiting global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial is feasible. Our Dossier is a civil society response to the challenge of such a limitation  that's also paving the way for climate justice. Because it’s is neither ‘naïve’ nor ‘politically unfeasible’, it is radically realistic.

The Irish Citizens' Assembly

The Citizens' Assembly brings together 99 randomly-selected citizens to debate the issues of the day. The issue of abortion, which the Irish Constitution's Eight Amendment explicitly bans, is the most controversial issue that the assembly has tackled to date.

A Crack in the Shell: New Documents Expose a Hidden Climate History

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Oil Giant Royal Dutch Shell has known about climate risks of fossil fuel production for six decades. As early as the 1980s Shell knew about their accountability for 4 % of global carbon emissions. Still, while pragmatically protecting their own offshore oil rigs from the dangers of sea level rise, Shell massively promoted climate denial and climate obstruction as the CIEL report shows.

Governing the Big Bad Fix? What to do about geoengineering

Geoengineering – large-scale manipulation of the Earth’s natural systems – is increasingly being presented as a strategy to counteract, dilute or delay climate change. Which international legal norms and agreements would contradict the different measures?

By Duncan Currie

Katowice: A European coal capital goes green

Nowhere in the EU is smog more suffocating than in southern Poland. This year, the polluted Polish mining city Katowice will host the COP24 climate conference. Ahead of that, change is in the air — and on the ground.

By Richard Fuchs

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