Coal Atlas

English

Protests: A broad alliance with staying power

Around the world, people are fighting back against the coal industry. Theyface repression, harassment and violence – but sometimes they are successful. A chapter from the Coal Atlas.

By Benjamin von Brackel

India: Rich in coal but poor in energy

Coal is an important part of India’s energy mix. Local production is not enough: strong demand is attracting imports from Australia and elsewhere. However, India has huge potential for renewable energy.

By Axel Harneit-Sievers

Subsidies: Hidden payments, unpaid bills

The coal industry uses taxpayers’ money to keep its prices low – and it does not compensate for the costs of climate change or disease. A brief look at the scale of the problem. A chapter from the Coal Atlas.

By Arne Jungjohann, Stefanie Groll, Lili Fuhr

EU energy policy: On track, but aiming too low

The European Union’s climate policy aims for lower emissions, lower consumption and an increase in renewable energy. The targets are achievable – but they ought to be more ambitious.

By Arne Jungjohann

Finance: Big players behind the scenes

Digging mines, building power plants and providing infrastructure cost billions. Many countries cannot afford the investments; credit agencies and multilateral and private banks are glad to step in.

By Arne Jungjohann

China: Black fuel, in the red

Change is under way for the world’s biggest coal consumer; consumption in 2014 was down. Renewables are up. Coal-fired power plants are working at less than full capacity. A chapter from the Coal Atlas.

By Arne Jungjohann

Labour: Dirty jobs in a dirty industry

Although coal production is still on the rise, the sector is employing fewer people. Structural change has spread to all continents. Nevertheless, mining underground remains one of the most dangerous occupations worldwide.

By Benjamin von Brackel

Health: Fine dust, fat price

Smoke and fumes from coal-fired power plants make us ill. They are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide each year. Atmospheric and environmental pollution from coal costs billions in health expenses.

By Heike Holdinghausen

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