Energy

English

Citizens: Many drops make a river

Energy Atlas

Conventional energy comes from a few large, powerful firms. But for renewable energy sources, it makes sense for the generation capacity to be owned by individuals and communities.

By Molly Walsh

Hungary: a state captured by Russia

Hungary’s liaison with the Kremlin has turned the economic “Eastern Opening” into the construction of a full-blown illiberal democracy. This goes hand in hand with Russia’s growing leverage over Hungary with respect to economic as well as soft power.

By Péter Krekó, Lóránt Győri

Global Hunger For Natural Resources

Unseen treasures with mysterious names beckon from the depths of the ocean: manganese nodules, cobalt crusts, black smokers. Hidden within them are rich concentrations of valuable metals.

The Energiewende as a European project

What options do German policymakers have when shaping the European Energiewende debate? The Heinrich Böll Foundation proposes a set of recommendations.

By Rebecca Bertram

South Africa - Making the right energy choices

The South African government has unreservedly endorsed the SDGs, noting that the triple challenge of poverty, unemployment and inequality that they address is also the primary focus of the country. This e-paper will show how the SDGs are conceptually aligned to the South Africa’s National Development Plan.

Energy Sustainability

The endorsement of the Paris Agreement at the Chinese G20 was clearly a step forward for energy sustainability in the face of climate change. Still the indications of how it might be achieved is limited in scope.

By Elizabeth Bast, Alex Doukas

Fossil fuel subsidies and finance

G20 governments are spending $444 billion every year to support fossil fuel production. These financial flows are limiting the expansion of renewable energies that could curb global warming and meet a variety of sustainable development goals.

By Elizabeth Bast, Alex Doukas

The Unthinkable in Climate Change: A View from Asia on Literature and Politics

Amitav Ghosh’s new book “The Great Derangement” examines climate change and climate policy from unusual perspectives. It is bound to get much international attention because it asks some fundamental new questions concerning the handling of climate change in literature and activist politics, and because it represents a well-known voice from Asia.

By Axel Harneit-Sievers

Pages