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Time for a Pushback in Media Spaces

Digital, online and social-media avenues undoubtedly offer an alternative or complementary channel for news, because of the inherent difficulty in censoring these spaces. Their wide reach and levels of engagement have saved lives during disasters or emergencies.

Open Season for Professional Media?

Journalists sued for espionage in Cambodia, and for using drones or supposedly violating the official secrets act in Myanmar. News outlets faced with financial penalties steep enough to cause them to go under, as it did in Cambodia. Media organizations in the Philippines repeatedly described as ‘fake news’ outlets by government officials chafing at critical reporting.

By Johanna Son

IT giants in China: a tough business

China suffers from draconian internet regulations, but enjoys a prosperous marketplace; it attracts IT giants from the United States and Europe, but it has also expelled some of them.

By Sophie Ping Sun

Pakistan’s cybercrime law: boon or bane?

While the Prevention of Electronic Crimes Act aims to counter rampant online harassment and terrorist content, it drew criticism for severely impacting citizens’ rights to expression and privacy.

By Farieha Aziz

Digital Asia

Perspectives

The latest Perspectives Asia edition covers the prozess of digitalization in Asia with contributions from all across the continent. Our online special presents all the articles with an additional podcast.

Hostile takeover: How Orbán is subjugating the media in Hungary

Viktor Orbán and his closest allies have taken control of most of the Hungarian media. Journalists at loyal outlets are expected to closely follow instructions from the state apparatus; in exchange, they receive advertising money from government institutions.

By Krisztián Simon, Tibor Rácz

Digital Media Stimulates Prominence of Local Perspectives in Favela Narratives

In an interview with Heinrich Böll Foundation Brasil, journalist Thamyra Thâmara, from Complexo do Alemão, speaks about the importance of digital media for popular communicators in the favelas–spaces which are stigmatized by the mainstream media and portrayed as impoverished and violent.

By Bruna de Lara, Thamyra Thâmara

The Regulation of Online-harassment

Violent communication has relevant effects on queer feminist internet activism. This article focuses on options and necessities of regulating such forms of violent anti-feminist and racist communication. How to prevent or to stop violent online-communication?

By Gitti Hentschel, Francesca Schmidt

Dissatisfaction peaks with internet tax

The year 2014 was supposed to be a year of success stories for Fidesz in Hungary. But demonstrations against the internet tax have become a channel through which the people have been able to express their dissatisfaction.

 

By András Jámbor

HE, SHE, I.T. – Who are we without Privacy?

At the conference "Whatever happened to privacy" the British author and blogger gave a insightful keynote in regard to the issues privacy and surveillance, creating some depth inregard to the worldwide appeal of the 562 authors, that appeared in public two days after the conference.

By Priya Basil

Whatever happened to Privacy?

What political actions are necessary to protect citizens from mass surveillance and what tools exist for people to secure their communications, movements and lives? This and other topics where discussed at our international activistm conference. Here you find the videos of the event.

Digital Rights

In recent years, debates about social media, web censorship, copyright, net neutrality, and intellectual property rights have gained momentum. Ever since the story about the NSA’s surveillance activities broke, basic and civil rights have been at the top of the agenda. Today, digital rights is not purely a question of “web politics” anymore, rather it is about a “digital society” and the question of how we want to live in the future.

Civil Society Goes Brussels

Businesses have long since grasped it – and now civil society is following suit: Whoever wants to make political gains can no longer afford to be solely active in their respective capitals. Whether it is about the environment, about consumer protection, about civil society in the digital age – increasingly Brussels is the place where the action is.  By Falk Lüke

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